VIDEO Youth Stop AIDS: We can end AIDS by 2030

WE CAN END AIDS BY 2030, and you can be part of it.

In 2015 we spoke to Tabitha Ha, James RestlessDev, and Georgia Hunt of national charity Youth Stop AIDS about their Missing Medicines campaign.
We learnt how many people living with HIV/AIDS have limited access to essential life-saving medication.

#WorldAIDSDay yesterday was a reminder that #ItAintOver, and we must continue to be vocal to MPs about ending AIDS.

Visit http://youthstopaids.org/ to learn more about how you can be part of the movement. Whether it is direct action, lobbying, or organising your local community, there are many ways that you can make your voice heard and have a measurable impact.

Watch our video here:

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AIDS – A Crisis for Us All: Lessons from the History of Gonorrhoea and Syphilis

 
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By Anthony O’Driscoll

Anthony is a postgraduate Law student, with a background in Human Sciences. He writes on Policy, Bioethics, Medicine, Public Health and society. 

 

Can history inform our views and subsequently our approach to problems brought forward by the AIDS Epidemic?

This question poses no certain answer, not least because there is no clear consensus on the construction of disease history. Societal responses to disease are guided by values routed in cultural, social and moral institutional precepts. This is perhaps most evident in AIDS, where our understanding has been warped by structures of identity, oppression, subversion and fear. Far from figurative, the fabrication of our perceptions have terribly important consequences – not only for the way we frame, approach and conceptualise disease policy – but also for the way in which social actors build a risk narrative in relation to their own proximity to morbid outcomes. Venereal disease is often unique in that the victims are seen as the cause and the embodiment of the disease. This builds a narrative of – ‘them and us’ – where there is a tendency to disengage from the pertinent problems at hand. In searching for groups to blame, do we pervert policy with ineffective social and cultural frames that hinder progression? In response let us consider three ages of venereal disease.

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